Glenturret Prowess joins Trinity Series in Lalique

by Melita Kiely

Scotland’s oldest working distillery, The Glenturret, has released the second single malt whisky in its Trinity Series in Lalique: The Glenturret Prowess.

Only 320 bottles of The Glenturret Prowess have been created, each presented in a crystal decanter designed by Marc Larminaux, artistic and creative director at Lalique. Each decanter is priced at £11,800 (US$14,350). Master blender Bob Dalgarno created the Scotch whisky. The liquid was drawn from two casks, one filled in 1987 and a second filled in 1988. At 33 years old, the whisky was bottled in December 2022. Dalgarno said: “Many hands touch the life of a whisky, each with a skill honed over time – true craftspeople, adding a chapter to the story as it passes them. “From the coopers who build the casks, the farmers who grow and harvest the barley, the distillery team who mash, distil and fill the new make spirit to cask, the warehousemen who keep watch over the maturation and the whisky maker who selects and decides on the destination of the spirit. This release is a celebration of these individuals who contribute to the process, a trophy in their honour.” The whisky has been bottled at 43.9% ABV without caramel colouring or chill-filtration. Tasting notes include wood spices, aromatics and oranges on the nose, leading to liquorice, raisins, chocolate and hints of crème brûlée. Ginger, rich fruit and vanilla lead to a clean oak finish. Commenting on the decanter design, Larminaux noted: “I took inspiration from the emotive iconography of trophies which celebrate success and prowess in a given field of pursuit. “This elegant and distinguished decanter represents the skills of our Lalique artisan crystal makers and the craftsmanship of the whisky-making team at Scotland’s oldest working distillery.” The Glenturret released several new whiskies earlier this year, including two limited edition single malts aged 25 and 30 years old. Furthermore, the distillery launched its oldest whisky to date in August, a 50-year-old single malt priced at £40,000 (US$47,000).

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